Things To Do

Things To Do -> History and Heritage -> Historic Landmarks

The Randolph County Historic Landmark Preservation Commission was created in 2008 to recognize buildings, places, sites and objects deemed important to the understanding of local history. To date, 20 landmarks and 22 cultural heritage sites and objecs have been desinated. In addition, 21 sites have been recorded on the National Register of Historic Places by the National Park Service, and four of those are also local landmarks.

Visitors must be aware that, whether designated by national, state, Randolph County or municipal governments, landmarks and cultural history sites are often privately owned and are not normally open to the public.

For additional information regarding accessibility and for a complete list of Cultural Heritage Sites, Historic Landmarks and Research options, please contact the Heart of North Carolina Visitors Bureau by phone at 800-626-2672 or 336-626-0364, or online at http://www.randolphcountync.gov/Visit-Randolph/Historic-Landmarks

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    1775 - 1800 Mt Shepherd Archaeological Pottery SitAsheboro

    Located on the Mt Shepherd Retreat Center & Camp, this archaeological pottery site is one of the few 18th century earthenware pottery kiln sites investigated in North Carolina.

    Public accessibility: Walking tour by appt only

    Disclaimer: Randolph County and its municipalities have designated a variety of historic landmarks. Just as with state and national historic landmarks, visitors should be aware that some are private and not open to the public. Please contact the Visitors Bureau for additional information regarding accessibility before traveling long distances.

  • 1782 Andrew Balfour Family Cemetery
    1782 Andrew Balfour Family CemeteryAsheboro

    The Andrew Balfour Family Cemetery consists of five graves of the Balfour family and marks the site of the assassination of Colonel Balfour by royalist Tory Forces during the Revolutionary War.

    Public accessibility: Self-guided walking tours

    Disclaimer: Randolph County and its municipalities have designated a variety of historic landmarks. Just as with state and national historic landmarks, visitors should be aware that some are private and not open to the public. Please contact the Visitors Bureau for additional information regarding accessibility before traveling long distances.

  • 1802 Sandy Creek Primitive Baptist Church
    1802 Sandy Creek Primitive Baptist ChurchLiberty

    Sandy Creek Primitive Baptist Church is the oldest organized church and oldest surviving religious structure in Randolph County. Founded in 1755 by Elder Shubal Stearns, it is considered the most significant landmark in Baptist history as noted by the nearby state historic marker designating it the "Mother of Southern Baptist Churches."

    Public accessibility: Self-guided walking tours

    Disclaimer: Randolph County and its municipalities have designated a variety of historic landmarks. Just as with state and national historic landmarks, visitors should be aware that some are private and not open to the public. Please contact the Visitors Bureau for additional information regarding accessibility before traveling long distances.

  • 1838 Franklinsville Manufacturing Company
    1838 Franklinsville Manufacturing CompanyFranklinville

    The Franklinsville Manufacturing Company was the first corporation ever to conduct business in Randolph County. It was the second textile mill in the County, building on the success of the Cedar Falls mill partnership which had begun operations in a converted grist mill in 1836.

    Public accessibility: Exterior views only

    Disclaimer: Randolph County and its municipalities have designated a variety of historic landmarks. Just as with state and national historic landmarks, visitors should be aware that some are private and not open to the public. Please contact the Visitors Bureau for additional information regarding accessibility before traveling long distances.

  • 1848 Austin Lawrence House
    1848 Austin Lawrence HouseFranklinville

    The Austin Lawrence House has woodwork and moldings made from the Greek Revival classical designs by architect Asher Benjamin (1773 -1845) as seen in his pattern books that were widely circulated in the first half of the 19th Century. After the Austin Lawrence family moved away around 1855, the Cedar Falls Mill Company owned the house and it was rented to various tenants for more than 100 years.

    Public accessibility: Tours by appt only

    Disclaimer: Randolph County and its municipalities have designated a variety of historic landmarks. Just as with state and national historic landmarks, visitors should be aware that some are private and not open to the public. Please contact the Visitors Bureau for additional information regarding accessibility before traveling long distances.

  • 1850 Hanks Masonic Lodge No. 128
    1850 Hanks Masonic Lodge No. 128Franklinville

    The 1850 Hanks Masonic Lodge No. 128 is one of the oldest public buildings in the area and was constructed to be the first Masonic Lodge established in Randolph County and survives as one of its last antebellum structures.

    Public accessibility: Exterior views only

    Disclaimer: Randolph County and its municipalities have designated a variety of historic landmarks. Just as with state and national historic landmarks, visitors should be aware that some are private and not open to the public. Please contact the Visitors Bureau for additional information regarding accessibility before traveling long distances.

  • 1855 Trinity Museum/Winslow House
    1855 Trinity Museum/Winslow HouseTrinity

    The Dr. Thomas L. Winslow house, now the Trinity Museum is one of approximately ten antebellum era houses left in the Old Trinity College, now known as Duke University in Durham, area of Highway 62 in Trinity.

    Public accessibility: Tours by appt only

    Disclaimer: Randolph County and its municipalities have designated a variety of historic landmarks. Just as with state and national historic landmarks, visitors should be aware that some are private and not open to the public. Please contact the Visitors Bureau for additional information regarding accessibility before traveling long distances.

  • 1860 Marmaduke Swaim Robins Law Office
    1860 Marmaduke Swaim Robins Law OfficeAsheboro

    The Marmaduke Swaim Robins Law Office is a two-room wooden building and the last surviving building on Asheboro's 19th century courthouse square.

    Public accessibility: Exterior views only

    Disclaimer: Randolph County and its municipalities have designated a variety of historic landmarks. Just as with state and national historic landmarks, visitors should be aware that some are private and not open to the public. Please contact the Visitors Bureau for additional information regarding accessibility before traveling long distances.

  • 1888 Gate Keepers House
    1888 Gate Keepers HouseAsheboro

    The Gatekeeper's House is the only surviving structure of the Basil John Fisher estate. Fisher, a native of Scotland, traveled to Asheboro in the mid-1880s to help manage a Randolph County gold mine and acquired a 384-acre estate that included the Gatekeeper's House. Originally located near Sunset Avenue, the house was moved to its present location in 1964 and is noted for its elaborate eaves and porch post brackets.

    Public accessibility: Exterior views; interior by appt only

    Disclaimer: Randolph County and its municipalities have designated a variety of historic landmarks. Just as with state and national historic landmarks, visitors should be aware that some are private and not open to the public. Please contact the Visitors Bureau for additional information regarding accessibility before traveling long distances.

  • 1909 Randolph County Courthouse
    1909 Randolph County CourthouseAsheboro

    This historic structure, the third courthouse location in Randolph County, opened on July 12, 1909. The design combines the complex, flamboyant massing of 19th century Victorianism with the motifs of American Beaux-Arts classicism. The form of the building is reminiscent of the neighborhood of "American Foursquare" homes along nearby Worth Street--boxy two-story cubes with hipped roofs.

    Public accessibility: Exterior views; interior by appt only

    Disclaimer: Randolph County and its municipalities have designated a variety of historic landmarks. Just as with state and national historic landmarks, visitors should be aware that some are private and not open to the public. Please contact the Visitors Bureau for additional information regarding accessibility before traveling long distances.

  • 1911 Pisgah Covered Bridge
    1911 Pisgah Covered BridgeAsheboro

    This historic structure, one of North Carolina's two remaining covered bridges, was built in 1911 at a cost of $40. The bridge is 54 feet in length and crosses the West Fork Branch of the Little River within the Uwharrie National Forest and is a direct connection to the county's past mode of transportation when horse and wagon were common and automobile travel was in its infancy.

    Public accessibility: Self-guided walking tours

    Disclaimer: Randolph County and its municipalities have designated a variety of historic landmarks. Just as with state and national historic landmarks, visitors should be aware that some are private and not open to the public. Please contact the Visitors Bureau for additional information regarding accessibility before traveling long distances.

  • 1921 John Wesley's Stand
    1921 John Wesley's StandSophia

    John Wesley's Stand is Randolph County's last remaining example of a once familiar sight: the open-air tabernacle or brush arbor. Started in 1903 by the Rev. J.F. Burkhead of Asheboro, worship was first held under a brush arbor after which a small frame church building was erected in 1906. The tabernacle was built in 1921. The quartz rock pillars of the tabernacle are an echo of the popular Bungalow style of that time.

    Public accessibility: Self-guided walking tours

    Disclaimer: Randolph County and its municipalities have designated a variety of historic landmarks. Just as with state and national historic landmarks, visitors should be aware that some are private and not open to the public. Please contact the Visitors Bureau for additional information regarding accessibility before traveling long distances.

  • 1922 Old County Rest Home
    1922 Old County Rest HomeAsheboro

    Indigent relief was considered a function of local county government in North Carolina since 1777. Almost from its formation in 1779, Randolph County has looked after its indigent citizens. The Old County Rest Home was considered a state of the art facility when opened in 1922.

    Public accessibility: Exterior views only

    Disclaimer: Randolph County and its municipalities have designated a variety of historic landmarks. Just as with state and national historic landmarks, visitors should be aware that some are private and not open to the public. Please contact the Visitors Bureau for additional information regarding accessibility before traveling long distances.

  • 1929 Charles W. McCrary House
    1929 Charles W. McCrary HouseAsheboro

    The Charles W. McCrary House was designed by Greensboro architect Harry Barton for the eldest son of D.B. McCrary, textile industrialist and former Asheboro mayor. This imposing Classical Revival house is located on the previous home site of N.C. Governor Jonathan Worth.

    Public accessibility: Exterior views only

    Disclaimer: Randolph County and its municipalities have designated a variety of historic landmarks. Just as with state and national historic landmarks, visitors should be aware that some are private and not open to the public. Please contact the Visitors Bureau for additional information regarding accessibility before traveling long distances.

  • 1929 Sunset Theatre
    1929 Sunset TheatreAsheboro

    The Sunset Theatre, a Spanish Colonial Revival-style theatre, was the first theatre constructed in Asheboro specifically to show "talking" movies. It was designed by Greensboro architect W. C. Holleyman, Jr. based on examples of "Moorish Pictures Palaces" popular in southern California. Cast-stone frieze decorations on both the exterior and interior feature helmeted soldiers and shields with a tile-roof awning capping the stuccoed facade.

    Public accessibility: Yes

    Disclaimer: Randolph County and its municipalities have designated a variety of historic landmarks. Just as with state and national historic landmarks, visitors should be aware that some are private and not open to the public. Please contact the Visitors Bureau for additional information regarding accessibility before traveling long distances.

  • 1933 J. Frank McCrary House
    1933 J. Frank McCrary HouseAsheboro

    The J. Frank McCrary House is a Tudor-Revival-style manor house designed by Greensboro architect W.C. Holleyman, Jr. for J. Frank McCrary, son of D.B. McCrary, textile industrialist and former Asheboro mayor. A large oak tree located in front of the house is said to have been planted by Governor Jonathan Worth.

    Public accessibility: Exterior views; interior by appt only

    Disclaimer: Randolph County and its municipalities have designated a variety of historic landmarks. Just as with state and national historic landmarks, visitors should be aware that some are private and not open to the public. Please contact the Visitors Bureau for additional information regarding accessibility before traveling long distances.

  • 1938 Asheboro Municipal Building
    1938 Asheboro Municipal BuildingAsheboro

    The Asheboro Municipal Building is the city's foremost example of the Art Deco architectural style popular during the 1920s and 1930s. Constructed as a federal Public Works Administration project toward the end of the Great Depression, it is historically significant in that it was the city's first building constructed to combine all its government and public infrastructure including the fire and police, water, and tax departments; city administration, engineering, and the mayor's courtroom. Total cost of the building when completed was $73,215.

    Public accessibility: Exterior views; interior by appt only

    Disclaimer: Randolph County and its municipalities have designated a variety of historic landmarks. Just as with state and national historic landmarks, visitors should be aware that some are private and not open to the public. Please contact the Visitors Bureau for additional information regarding accessibility before traveling long distances.

  • 1949 Petty Enterprises
    1949 Petty EnterprisesRandleman

    Petty Enterprises is the historic name associated with the Petty NASCAR racing team and the Petty family legacy. The landmark designation includes not only the former home of both Lee, Richard, and Maurice Petty, ca. 1927, but the racing workshop and fabrication facilities built by the Petty family, ca. 1949.

    Public accessibility: Yes

    Disclaimer: Randolph County and its municipalities have designated a variety of historic landmarks. Just as with state and national historic landmarks, visitors should be aware that some are private and not open to the public. Please contact the Visitors Bureau for additional information regarding accessibility before traveling long distances.