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Personal Collecting, Institutional Collections and Pottery Identification at the NC Pottery Center

Posted on 02/22/12

Seagrove, NC - Plan to join us for two special event days complementing our current exhibit: What's Upstairs? Seeing the NCPC's Hidden Treasures.

A frequent complaint of museum-goers is that much of a museum's collection of objects and artifacts is stored away out of view and is rarely seen by anyone but staff and qualified researchers. Understandably, museum collections can be vast in size and public exhibition space is often large enough to display only a fraction of an institution's holdings at any one time.

So, for the first time, many objects not previously included in NCPC exhibits have been brought downstairs for visitors' viewing and enjoyment. In addition, a sample of the Center's significant collection of art pottery produced by Lee County's North State Pottery is displayed. In the future, more of the stored objects will be added to the permanent collection exhibit and others will be incorporated into upcoming short term exhibitions.

Open for view from February 17 through April 28, What's Upstairs? Seeing the NCPC's Hidden Treasures will be complemented by two special event days on March 10 and April 14 (noon - 2 p.m. each day). In addition to speakers on each day discussing both personal and institutional collection of North Carolina pottery, experts will be available to identify and discuss visitors' own North Carolina pottery brought in for identification.

The NCPC will release a new catalog March 10th, this is a color catalog of Alamance County Historical Stoneware, highlighting in print the first time a large group of these spectacular pots have been seen together since they emerged from Alamance County kilns about a hundred and sixty years ago. The text is by potter and curator Mark Hewitt.

On April 14th, along with the festivities, two catalogs will be released. The first catalog highlights pieces from the North Carolina Pottery Center's permanent collection with text by the curator of this exhibit, Steve Compton author and pottery collector. The other catalog being released is a first of its kind, a rare grouping of nineteenth and twentieth century Grave Markers that take many forms and often have names, dates, and epitaphs inscribed on them. The catalog text is by Dr. Charles Zug, author and curator of a number of pottery exhibits.

Both events are open to the public and will be educational and entertaining. The catalogs will be for sale and the curators will be signing catalogs and answering questions. We encourage you to bring in old North Carolina pottery pieces to find out more about them. We will also have instructions for donating pottery to the NCPC'S permanent collection, which is a taxable deduction. Light refreshments will be served.

The mission of the North Carolina Pottery Center is to promote public awareness of and appreciation for the history, heritage, and ongoing tradition of pottery making in North Carolina. The Center is located at 233 East Avenue in Seagrove, NC. Hours of operation are Tue - Sat 10 am - 4 pm. For more information, please call 336.873.8430 or go to www.ncpotterycenter.org.

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